Open Letter to President Macron

With the support of our partners (Equality Fund – EF, the Association for Women’s Rights in Development – AWID, and the Fund for Congolese Women – FFC), we have written an open letter to the French President, Emmanuel Macron, regarding the “Support Fund for Feminist Organizations” of 120 million euros. At the date of the letter's submission on December 8th 2020, we had collected 194 signatures. Today, this number has grown to 200 signatures. You can still continue to sign the letter to increase its impact.

THANKS SO MUCH TO THOSE WHO HAVE ALREADY SUPPORTED OUR INITIATIVE. IF YOU HAVE NOT SIGNED ALREADY, YOU CAN STILL DO SO BY FILLING OUT THE ONLINE FORM

DOWNLOAD THE FULL PDF VERSION OF THE LETTER. 

 

 

Below is the open letter:

Mr. President,

We, the undersigned, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations,

Congratulate France for its commitment to women’s rights and the feminist cause through the adoption of France’s International Strategy for Equality between Women and Men 2018-2022[1];

Appreciate France’s ambition to implement a development policy to achieve SDG n°5 by 2030: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls[2];

Welcome your initiative to disburse the Support Fund for Feminist Organizations (SFFO)” of 120 million euros over three years to support feminist movements working for gender equality[3];

Salute France’s promotion of feminist diplomacy, and in particular the French Development Agency (FDA), which places gender equality at the center of its social commitments[4];

Applaud the FDA’s Call for projects “Support for feminist organizations in the South” for an amount of 15 million euros, which is the first disbursement of the SFFO[5];

Appreciate the FDA’s recognition of the vital importance of “supporting the feminist associative movement in the South as a fundamental lever for achieving this ambition on equality between women and men[6];

Congratulate the FDA for its “dual objective of (i) financing small CSOs [Civil Society Organizations] that are currently not eligible for other windows, for such high amounts, and (ii) financing the most relevant structures and projects[7];

Look forward to the forthcoming disbursement of 40 million euros which modalities are currently under discussions with French CSOs and women’s groups;

Mr. President,

We, the undersigned, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations,

Concerned, however, by the many conditionalities linked to the management of this first grant of 15 million euros which greatly restricts the number and type of organizations that can qualify to manage these funds;

Note that the financial criterion by which the organization carrying out the project or the leader of the consortium “must . . . present an average annual budget equal to or greater than 5 million euros[8] eliminates the majority of feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations working in developing countries, including most Women’s Funds;    

Highlight that in the past high thresholds such as these have worked against a government’s well-intentioned objective of supporting feminist movements in the Global South. One stark example in recent years is the Dutch Funding Leadership and Opportunities for Women (FLOW) program which was a direct successor of the MDG3 Fund. In the second round of funding (FLOW II), it came across a classic ‘stumbling block’: setting eligibility requirements that most Women’s Rights Organizations (WROs) could not meet, such as a minimum grant of 5 million euros. Proposals selected for a grant were submitted by Dutch and international civil society organizations, most of which had a gender equality and women’s rights focus in their activities but are not themselves women’s organizations or movements. In response to strong critical feedback from feminist movements followed by an amendment in Parliament, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) set up a new funding program, Leading from the South. It also changed the eligibility criteria for the FLOW successor, Power of Women, to exclusively support WROs. Via open calls for proposals in different languages, Leading from the South, managed through four regional women’s funds, provides smaller grants and core funding support exclusively to feminist groups and WROs working at the regional, national, and grassroots levels in the Global South[9];

Emphasize the risk that feminist organizations will be excluded from accessing quality grants from this first round of funding is real because as you so well recognized in the Call for projects: “[They] are often small structures that are not intended to grow. Only a small majority of young feminist organizations are declared, either by choice or by difficulty”[10]. Indeed, AWID’s research Watering the Leaves, Starving the Roots, published in 2013, highlights that the average annual budget of women’s rights organizations was 20,000 USD (16.850 euros)[11] and there is little evidence to believe that this situation has significantly changed since. Moreover, there is no doubt that the feminist and women’s rights organizations led by young women, and working on intersectional issues or issues considered “controversial” – such as sexual and reproductive health and rights (an issue prioritized in the FDA’s Call) – have even smaller annual budgets;

Note that autonomous feminist movements have been proven repeatedly to be the most important factor in achieving lasting change for women’s rights. If France wants to have a significant impact in this area, which it has, itself, identified as a priority, a significant investment directly in favor of these movements is necessary;

Mr. President,

We, the undersigned, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations,

Concerned by the manner in which the FDA defined ‘feminist organizations’ in the June 25, 2020 Meeting report: “These may be structures that work in the field of women’s rights and inequalities, but also structures that work on the themes from the Call for projects (Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, Gender-Based Violence, Women’s Economic Empowerment). It is not because the NGO [Non-Governmental Organization] is not labeled feminist that they cannot be funded if they do work in the areas of intervention outlined in the call for projects. It is up to the consortium to select the most pertinent actors.”[12]

For us within feminist movements, the terms ‘feminist movements’ and ‘women’s rights organizations’ are used interchangeably to refer to groups that:

  • work from a feminist and/or women’s rights perspective;
  • are led by the people they serve;
  • have the promotion of women’s, girl’s, and/or trans people’s human rights as their primary mission, and not just as part of their programs;
  • push for structural change for women and girls;
  • and work on issues that are marginalized and/or contested, frequently within contexts that place the activists themselves at risk for the work they are doing.

CSOs and international NGOs (INGOs) whose missions are not grounded in feminist and/or women’s rights perspectives are different actors. They also have a part to play in the fight for gender equality, however, it is not the same, as women’s rights organizations and feminist movements.  They may do gender-related programing or include a feminist lens in some areas, but it does not constitute their core mission. Moreover, they do not do locally based, self-led feminist work, and importantly, they are not part of, or accountable to, feminist movements. At best, they can be allies to feminist movements; at worst, they compete with them for funding and/or push an agenda that is reformist rather than one that aims to secure structural change for all women, girls, and trans people[13];

Mr. President,

Considering that over the last decade, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations received less than 1% of Official Development Assistance (ODA) that focused on gender equality[14] and more importantly that three-quarters of ODA funding does not leave bilateral development agencies[15], circulating instead into the agencies’ gender programing; the remaining money which is allocated outside of development agencies goes almost entirely to larger CSOs and INGOs—the vast majority based in the Global North;

Stress that it is critical that France’s commitment to invest 120 million euros into feminist initiatives over the next three years achieves its stated objectives and truly reaches WROs and feminist groups in the Global South;

Mr. President,

We, the undersigned, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations,

Request that the grant package which will be reallocated to organizations through the first Call for Projects as well as all subsequent Calls, justly integrates institutional costs linked with the management of recipient organizations;

Ask that a similar criterion be incorporated into the grant allocation guidelines of the consortium or organization which will be selected to manage the future funds of 40 million euros to cover the institutional costs of the recipient organizations, costs which are equally as important as those of international organizations;

Note that the funds released through the first Call for Projects “Support for Feminist Organizations in the South” represent project funds rather than general support funds since they specify the amount to be administered by budget line, which does not give beneficiary organizations the latitude to make changes to budget lines in the event of an unforeseen change of context;

Affirm that what feminist organizations want, and need are quality, multi-year, flexible and self-MANAGED financial resources for their initiatives; and

Therefore, ask the FDA and the French government to ensure that the consortium that has been selected to manage this first fund as well as the entity that will manage future funds, properly integrates this criterion into their final proposals;

Request additionally that similarly to the ongoing consultations with French CSOs, consultations be set up with feminist organizations in FDA partner countries to give them the opportunity to provide inputs into the design of the funding modalities for the remaining amount left of the 120 million euros promised. This would make the entire process more participatory – and maybe it could even become a participatory grantmaking process. Moreover, this would undoubtedly increase France’s accountability to the groups it is aiming to support; 

Call for a mechanism to be put in place to monitor and ensure the correct implementation of the directives specified by the FDA and the French government. This mechanism could be a monitoring committee composed mainly of leaders of women’s and young women’s organizations, a committee thus representative of the target population of this initiative;

Call on the FDA and the French government to ensure that the selection process of the beneficiary organizations of these funds does not leave any women’s and young women’s organizations behind;

Consequently, we request that a specific percentage of the grants be allocated only to feminist organizations and women’s and young women’s rights organizations in the Global South.

Mr. President,

We, the undersigned, feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations,

Hope that the French government, by accepting our requests, proves its understanding of the real needs of feminist and women’s and young women’s rights organizations. As Co-Chair of the Generation Equality Forum, France has the opportunity, in its next round of funding, to set an example for best practice in feminist funding.

Finally, we hope that our voices will be heard, that corrective measures will be taken, and that additional instructions will be given so that the “Support Fund for Feminist Organizations” and its subsequent funds truly benefits the feminist and women’s and young women’s organizations of the Global South targeted.

 

Drafted by XOESE, The Francophone Women’s Fund[i]

With the support of:

 

List of signatory organizations

 

Women’s funds and foundations

  1. Mama Cash Women’s Fund[v], The Netherlands/International; https://www.mamacash.org/en/en-homepage
  2. Global Fund for Women (GFW)[vi], USA/International; https://www.globalfundforwomen.org/
  3. FRIDA, the Young Feminist Fund (FRIDA)[vii], Canada/International; https://youngfeministfund.org/
  4. Equality Fund (EF), Canada/International; https://www.equalityfund.ca/
  5. Urgent Action Fund-Africa (UAF-Africa)[viii], Africa; https://www.uaf-africa.org/
  6. The Fund for Congolese Women (FFC), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.ffcrdc.org/?no_lredirect=true
  7. Fonds pour l’Autonomisation des Femmes Rurales d’Haiti (FAFR-Haiti), Haiti;
  8. Batonga Foundation[ix], USA/ Benin/International; https://batongafoundation.org/
  9. Foundation for a Just Society (FJS)[x], USA/International; https://www.fjs.org/
  10. African Women’s Development Fund (AWDF)[xi], Africa ; https://awdf.org/

Women’s organizations, networks and platforms

  1. Action communautaire pour le Bien-être de l’Enfant et de la Femme au Burkina (ABEFAB), Burkina Faso; 
  2. Action Genre et Initiatives de Renforcement (AGIR asbl), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  3. Action pour la Promotion et le Développement de la Femme (APDF), Togo;
  4. Action pour la Promotion et le Développement Intégral de la Femme et de L’enfant (APRODIFE), Togo;
  5. Action Visant l’Éducation et Valorisation des Enfants et Femmes Non Assistés (AVEVENA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  6. Action-Genre-Identité et Responsabilité (AGIR), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/Asso.AGIR/
  7. Association au Support pour le Bien-être aux Mères et Enfants, Mauritania;
  8. Association Burkinabé des Femmes Battantes (ABFB), Burkina Faso; https://www.toriyaba.org/femmes-battantes/
  9. Association de l’Espoir pour le Bien-être de la Mère et de l’Enfant, Mauritania;
  10. Association de Lutte contre les Violences faites aux Femmes (ALVF-EN), Cameroon; http://alvf-en.org/
  11. Association de Mangbetu Femmes de Bunia (AMAFB), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  12. Association des Femmes Africaines pour la Recherche et le Développement (AFARD/AAWORD Togo), Togo;
  13. Association des Femmes Éleveuses du Maniema (AFELMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  14. Association des Femmes Handicapées de Madagascar (AFHAM), Madagascar; http://www.afham.mg/
  15. Association des Femmes Juristes Congolaises (AFJC), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.facebook.com/femmesfrancaisesjuristes/
  16. Association des Femmes Leaders pour le Progrès (AFLP), Burkina Faso;
  17. Association des Femmes Paysannes (AFP), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  18. Association des Femmes pour le Développement Durable Accéléré (AFeDDA), Benin; https://www.facebook.com/AFeDDABenin/
  19. Association des Femmes Vivant avec Handicap au Maniema, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  20. Association des Mamans Anti-Bwaki (AMAB), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  21. Association des Reines Mères du Grand Kloto (ARMGK), Togo;
  22. Association Féminine la Lumière (AFEL), Togo; https://www.afel-togo.org/
  23. Association Femmes et Enfants (AFE), Cameroon;
  24. Association Femmes Leadership et Développement Durable (AFLED), Mali; https://www.facebook.com/AFLEDMALI/
  25. Association Malienne pour le Suivi et l’Orientation des Pratiques Traditionnelles (AMSOPT), Mali ; http://alliancedroitsetsante.equipop.org/amsopt/
  26. Association pour la Défense des Droits de la Femme (ADDF), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.facebook.com/Association-pour-la-D%C3%A9fense-des-Droits-de-la-Femme-ADDF-897723293578077/
  27. Association Rel-Wende-N’Paam-Panga des Femmes Handicapées Motrices du Burkina Faso (ARPP/BF), Burkina Faso;
  28. Association Santé Mère et Enfant et la Lutte contre la Malnutrition (ASMELM), Mauritania;
  29. Association Songtaaba des Femmes Unies pour le Développement (ASFUD), Burkina Faso ; http://www.song-taaba.org/qui-sommes-nous.html
  30. Association Tujenge Kwetu Maniema (ATK-MANIEMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  31. Associations les Amies de Sœur Deborah (ASD), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  32. Bien-être Femme et Enfant Togo (BEFET), Togo;
  33. Cadire Cameroon Association, Cameroon;
  34. Cadre Permanent de Concertation de la Femme Congolaise (CAFCO-MANIEMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo ; http://cafco-cd.org/
  35. Carrefour des Femmes de Bikenge (CARREFOUR), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  36. Carrefour des Femmes et Familles (CAFEFA), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://cafefa.org/
  37. Centre d’Encadrement pour la Promotion de la Femme et la Jeune Fille (CEPF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  38. Centre Ombre des Femmes du Burundi (COFEM), Burundi;
  39. Centre pour la Promotion des Droits de la Femme (CEPROF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  40. Coalition Beijing 25+ /RDC (CB25+/RDC), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  41. Collectif des Femmes du Haut-Uele (COFEHU), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  42. Collectif des Femmes du Mali (COFEM), Mali; http://courantsdefemmes.free.fr/Assoces/Mali/COFEM/cofem.html
  43. Collectif Nos Voix Comptent, Benin/International; https://www.facebook.com/groups/144489306273179/
  44. Consortium Femme et Justice, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  45. Coopération des Œuvres Sociales de la Femme (COSFEMME-ASBL) International, Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.facebook.com/Asbl-Cosfemme-Internationale-1584429084997649/
  46. Coordination des Organisations Féminines du Togo (COFET), Togo; http://www.cofet-togo.org/
  47. Coude à Coude pour le Développement au Féminin (CCDF), Togo;
  48. Département Femme et Famille Provincial (DFF Mbuji-Mayi), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  49. Directoire des Organisations Féminines pour les Actions de Paix (DIOFAP), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  50. Dynamique pour la Promotion des Droits de la Femme (DPDF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  51. Encadrement des Femmes Indigènes et des Ménages Vulnérables (EFIM), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  52. Femme Action pour le Développement de la Famille (FADEF), Benin;
  53. Femme et Environnement (BG), Central African Republic;
  54. Femme Handicapée sans Frontière (FHSF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  55. Femme Plus Togo (FPT), Togo;
  56. Femmes Artisanes de la Paix, Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.iofc.org/fr/programmes/femmes-artisans-de-paix
  57. Femmes Unies pour la Paix dans la région des Grands Lacs (FUP/G), Burundi/Sub Regional; https://www.facebook.com/Femmes-Unies-pour-la-Paix-dans-la-Region-des-Grands-Lacs-1624458184321714/
  58. Femmes-Santé-Développement (FESADE), Cameroon;
  59. Fonds d’Initiatives Féminines Locales (FIFL), Burundi;
  60. Forum de la Femme Ménagère (FORFEM), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  61. Forum des Mères Célibataires (FMC), Togo ; https://www.facebook.com/Sosmerescelibataires/
  62. Godu Kadu Nema, Mali;
  63. Groupe d’Action pour la Promotion de la Femme (GAPROF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  64. Groupe International pour le Renforcement des Capacités Féminines (GIRCAFEM), Togo;
  65. Groupement Féminin Pag-La-Naam, Burkina Faso;
  66. Happy Women Home, Cameroon; https://www.facebook.com/HAPPY-WOMEN-HOME-106539514046862/
  67. Jigéen Feseul Jëf (JFJ), Senegal; https://www.facebook.com/Jig%C3%A9en-Feseul-J%C3%ABf-101029201615612/
  68. L’AURORE de la Femme, Togo; https://www.aurore.asso.fr/pole-urgence-sociale-et-hebergement/chs-chu-le-hameau-coeur-de-femmes
  69. La Colombe, Togo; http://ngolacolombetogo.org/
  70. Le Groupe d’actions pour la Promotion de l’Éducation, la Formation de la Femme et de la Jeune Fille (GAPEF), Burkina Faso;
  71. Leadafricaines, The Ivory Coast/Sub Regional; https://www.facebook.com/groups/leadafricaines/?ref=pages_profile_groups_tab&amp%3Bsource_id=231273500371406
  72. Ligue pour la Promotion et la Défense des Droits de la Femme (LIPRODF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  73. Marche Mondiale des Femmes (MMF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  74. Medica Liberia (mL), Liberia; https://www.facebook.com/medica-Liberia-1605299563026966/
  75. MUSONET-Mali, Mali; https://musonetmali.wordpress.com/about/
  76. Mutuelle pour le Développement Économique et Social de la Femme Tchadienne (MUDESOFT), Tchad;
  77. ONG Femmes Initiatives et Actions pour un Développement Intégral (FIADI), Togo;
  78. ONG WOIYO KONDEYE, Mali; https://woiyokondeye.wordpress.com/woiyo-kondeye/
  79. Pilier aux Femmes Vulnérables Actives (PIFEVA), Democratic Republic of the Congo; http://www.pifeva.org/
  80. Promotion de Sante de Reproduction (PSR), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  81. Réseau des Associations de Femmes en Action pour le Développement (RAFAD), Togo;
  82. Réseau des Femmes et Développement des Savanes (REFED/S), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/RefedSavanes/
  83. Réseau des Femmes pour le Développement (RFEDE), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  84. Réseau des ONG et Associations de Femmes contre la Féminisation du VIH et les violences sur le genre au Benin (ROAFEM VIH-SIDA), Benin; http://courantsdefemmes.free.fr/Assoces/Benin/ROAFEM/ROAFEM.html
  85. Réseau des ONG et Associations des Femmes (ROAFEM), Benin;
  86. Réseau des Organisations Féminines d’Afrique Francophone (ROFAF), Togo/Regional ; http://www.rofaf.org/
  87. Réseau Femme et Développement (REFED), Democratic Republic of the Congo; http://www.irenees.net/bdf_fiche-acteurs-353_fr.html
  88. Réseau Genre et Droits de la Femme (GEDROFE), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  89. Réseau International Francophone des Aînés (RIFA), France/International ;
  90. Réseau paix et sécurité des femmes de l’espace CEDEAO, section-Côte d’Ivoire (REPSFECO-CI), the Ivory Coast;
  91. Réseau SOS Femmes en Détresse (SOS FED), Burundi; http://sosfed.org/
  92. Réveil de la Femme (RF), Togo;
  93. Réveil des Femmes pour le Développement Intègre (RFEDI), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  94. Saufemed pour Mère et Enfants, Mauritania;
  95. Service Par, Pour et Avec les Femmes (SEPPAF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  96. Solidarité des Femmes Burundaises pour le Bien-être social et le progrès au Burundi (SFBSP), Burundi; https://www.facebook.com/solidaritedesfemmesburundaises/
  97. Solidarité Féminine pour la Paix et le Développement Intégral (SOFEPADI), Democratic Republic of the Congo ; https://www.sofepadirdc.org/
  98. Solidarité Femme pour un Futur Meilleur (SFFM), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  99. Solidarité Femmes pour un Développement Durable des Savanes (SF2D-S), Togo;
  100. Soutien aux Actions des Femmes Indigentes au Maniema (SAFI-MANIEMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  101. Synergie Sénégalaise pour l’Éducation et le Développement (SYSED), Senegal; https://sysed.wordpress.com/
  102. The Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID), Canada/International; https://www.awid.org/
  103. Une Femme qui en Soulève une Autre (FESA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  104. Union Chrétienne Féminine du Togo/Young Women’s Christian Association (UCF/YWCA-TOGO), Togo;
  105. Union de Genre pour le Développement Social, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  106. Union des Cœurs Compatissants (UCCOM), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://uccom-asbl.org/a-propos/
  107. Union des Femmes Chefs d’Entreprises du Sénégal (UFCE SENEGAL), Senegal;
  108. Union des Femmes Paysannes du Maniema (UFEPA-MANIEMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  109. Union pour la Promotion des Femmes (UPF asbl), Democratic Republic of the Congo
  110. Vivre En Comptant sur les Femmes (VECOF), Cameroon;
  111. Wapandaji (AW), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  112. WASE Women, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  113. Winner Group, Togo;
  114. Women AgrobussnessClub (WABC), Togo;
  115. Women and Children Protection (WCP), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  116. Women Environmental Programme Burkina (WEP), Burkina; http://climatdeveloppement.org/lercd/women-environmental-program-burkina-faso/
  117. Women in Action for Human Dignity (WAHDi), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  118. Women in Front Camerron Plus (WIFC++), Cameroon; https://www.facebook.com/Women-In-Front-Cameroon-336520560175498/
  119. Women`s International League for Peace and Freedom(WILPF TOGO), Togo;

 

Young women’s and youth organizations

  1. Association de Jeunes pour la Paix et la Démocratie (ASJPDabl), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.peaceinsight.org/en/organisations/association-of-youth-for-peace-and-development/?location=nigeria&theme
  2. Association Matumaini, Democratic Republic of the Congo, https://matumainiasbl.org/en/
  3. Association pour la Promotion de la Fille Burundaise (APFB), Burundi; https://www.facebook.com/Association-pour-la-Promotion-de-la-Fille-Burundaise-601014243253748/
  4. Association pour la Promotion des Droits des Jeunes (APDJ), Burkina Faso;
  5. Avenir des Jeunes Filles de Dapaong (AJFD), France;
  6. Carrefour d’Enfants du Congo (CARRECO), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  7. Club des Jeunes Filles Leaders de Guinea (CJFLG), Guinea; https://www.facebook.com/Club-des-jeunes-filles-leaders-de-Guin%C3%A9e-1097815493599262/
  8. Collectif National des Organisation de la Protection de l’Enfance (CNOPE), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  9. Forum pour les Droits des Jeunes et Enfants au Congo (FODJEC), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  10. Mouvement Girls’ Motion (M.G.M), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/girlsmotiontg/
  11. Organisation Jeunesse pour le Développement Communautaire (ORJEDEC), Togo;
  12. Réseau des enfants et Jeunes Africains pour les Droits Humains (REJADH), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.facebook.com/R%C3%A9seau-des-enfants-et-des-jeunes-africains-pour-les-droits-humains-111259897027710/
  13. Si Jeunesse Savait (SJS), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://mwasi.com/

Other organizations

  1. Action Congolaise pour le Respect des Droits Humains (ACRDH), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  2. Action de Volontaires pour la Solidarité et le Développement (AVSD), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  3. Action pour la Protection et la Promotion des Indigents et des Personnes Vulnérables (APPIV), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  4. Aide Rapide aux Victimes des Catastrophes (ARVC), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  5. Aides aux Personnes Démunies (APED), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  6. Assistance Plus Togo (AP-T), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/Association-assistance-PLUS-TOGO-100594948179768/
  7. Association des Amis de la Solidarité Sociale et du Développement (ASD), Guinea;
  8. Association des Volontaires pour la Réconciliation et le Développement aux Pays des Grands-Lacs (AVRD PGL), Democratic Republic of the Congo/Sub Regional;
  9. Association du Développement et de la promotion de Droit de l’Homme (ADPDH), Mauritania;
  10. Association IMARA, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  11. Association Mwangaza, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  12. Association Nationale pour l’Alphabétisation et la Formation Adulte (ANAFA), Senegal; http://courantsdefemmes.free.fr/Assoces/Senegal/ANAFA/anafa.html
  13. Association pour le Développement Agropastorel et Sanitaire (DAGROPASS), Burundi;
  14. Association Solidarité des Productrices Agro-pastorales de Ouahigouya (ASPAGO), Burkina Faso; https://sites.google.com/site/sb49aps/association-des-paysans-solidaires-de-ouahigouya
  15. Association Tukumbuke, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  16. Association Tuungane Marungu, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  17. Associations de Jumeaux pour le Développement Actif Social (AJDAS), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  18. Bureau d’Appui et d’Assistance Technique aux Initiatives de Développement (BATIDE), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  19. Centre d’Appui à la Promotion de la Santé (CAPSA), Democratic Republic of the Congo ; https://capsa-org.com
  20. Centre d’Action Communautaire pour le Développement Intègre (CACDI asbl), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  21. CHARI-CONGO, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  22. Collectif des Organisation Appuis aux Vulnérables (COAV), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  23. Comité de Pasteur (COPAIS), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  24. Comité National Femme et Développement (CONAFED), Democratic Republic of the Congo ; https://conafed.org
  25. Confédération Paysanne du Congo (COPACO), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  26. Département Femme et Famille/Église du Christ au Congo (DFF/ECC/MANIEMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  27. Engagés Ensemble pour la Promotion de la Paix et le Développement (EPD), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  28. Espoir pour tous (EPT), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  29. Espoir-Vie, The Ivory Coast; https://www.facebook.com/ONG-Espoir-Vie-Officiel-2238560249567843
  30. Familles Engagées pour le Développement Inclusif en Afrique (FEDIA), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/FEDIAtogo/
  31. Hommes pour la Défense des Droits des Femmes et des Filles (Hom-Dedff), Senegal;
  32. Horizon Développement (H.D.), Togo ; http://horizondev.e-monsite.com
  33. Initiative pour un Développement Durable en Afrique (I2DA), Togo; https://www.facebook.com/idda.developpement.durable.afrique/
  34. KAMBI Kakata (KAMBI), Burkina Faso;
  35. Ligue pour la Solidarité Congolaise (LSC), Democratic Republic of the Congo; https://www.facebook.com/Ligue-Pour-La-Solidarite-Congolaise-LSC-581992608534753/
  36. Lisanga Ya Bana Faradje (LIBAFAR), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  37. NGO Business and Professional Women France (BPW France), France; http://www.bpw.fr/fr/accueil
  38. NGO Rescue and Hope, Benin; https://rescueandhope.org/
  39. Organisation des Devoirs de l’Homme (ODH), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  40. PACOPA, Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  41. Pastorale de Missionnaire Famille (PMF), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  42. Programme d’Accompagnement de la Population pour le Développement Intégré et Durable (PADID), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  43. Programme d’Assistance et Protection des Personnes Vivant avec Handicap (PAPH), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  44. Programme Intègre pour le Développement du Sud (PIDSK), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  45. Rayon de Solidarité et d’Action pour un Développement Durable (RASADD-Salam), Niger; https://rayondesolidarite.org/
  46. Réseau de Para Juriste du Maniema (REPAJUMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  47. Save Our Africa (SOS Afrique), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  48. Solidarité des Mutuelles pour la Santé, les Affaires Sociales, le Développement et l’Éducation (SOMSADE), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  49. Solidarité pour un Monde Meilleur (SMM), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  50. SOS Secours a la ferme en Déstresse (SFD), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  51. Takkom Jerry Polyvalence Culturelle et Environnementale (TPCE), Senegal; https://www.facebook.com/TPCE-Takkom-Jerry-Polyvalence-Culturelle-et-Environnementale–582202841942832/
  52. Umoja Wakulima WaCongo (UWACO asbl), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  53. Umoja Wamama wa Maendeleo (UMAMA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  54. Union Paysanne pour le Progrès de Pangi, Kailo, Kasongo, Kabambare (UPKA), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  55. Vision Communautaire (VICO), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  56. Vision pour le Développement de Fizi (VIDEFI), Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  57. Yalaa, Togo;
  58. YoungmenEngage for Equality2030, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

 

 

_____

[1] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 27

[2] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 27

[3] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 28

[4] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 28

[5] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p.1

[6] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p.29

[7] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 34

[8] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 3

[9] Excerpt from the AWID’s forthcoming report

[10] Multi-country call for projects file – Support for feminist organizations in the South 2020, p. 31

[11] Arutyunova, A. et Clark, C. (2013). Watering the Leaves, Starving the Roots, AWID. Retrieved from: https://www.awid.org/publications/watering-leaves-starving-roots.

[12] Call for Proposals Feminist Civil Society Organizations – Consultation Meeting of Thursday, June 25, 2020, p.4

[13] Source : AWID

[14] Staszewka, K., Dolker, T. et Miller, K. (2019, Jul 2). Only 1% of gender equality funding is going to women’s organisations – why ? Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/jul/02/gender-equality-support-1bn-boost-how-to-spend-it

[15] OECD DAC Network on Gender Equality (GENDERNET). (2016). Donor support to Southern women’s rights organisations, OECD Findings. Récupéré de : https://www.oecd.org/dac/gender-development/OECD-report-on-womens-rights-organisations.pdf

 

[i] XOESE, The Francophone Women’s Fund is a feminist foundation of public utility created on September 1st, 2015 and based in Lomé, Togo. XOESE’s mission is to mobilize financial, material and human resources and reinvest them to support the implementation of women’s and young women’s activists’ and organizations’ initiatives promoting women’s, young women’s and girls’ rights, their economic empowerment and gender equality in Global South French-speaking countries. The Fund’s objectives are to: (1) provide financial support for the implementation of initiatives promoting the rights of women, young women and girls; (2) strengthen the institutional capacity of women’s and young women’s organizations; (3) encourage and support innovative initiatives aiming the empowerment of women’s and young women’s organizations. For more information about XOESE, please visit: https://xoese.org/en/home/

 

[ii] The Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) is a global, feminist, membership, movement-support organization working to achieve gender justice and women’s human rights worldwide. AWID’s mission is to support feminist, women’s rights and gender justice movements to thrive, to be a driving force in challenging systems of oppression, and to co-create feminist realities. For more information about AWID, please visit: https://www.awid.org/

 

[iii] Powered by THE MATCH International Women’s Fund, the Equality Fund (EF) will drive the cultural, economic and political changes required to make a global gender equality a reality. The Equality Fund is a consortium of Canadian and international organizations deeply rooted in and connected to women’s organizations and movements and with expertise in international development, investment and philanthropy. For more information about the EF, please visit: https://www.equalityfund.ca/

 

[iv] The Fund for Congolese Women (FFC) is the only women’s fund in the Democratic Republic of Congo. As a women’s rights organization established in 2007, FFC builds the capacity of local and informal grassroots women’s organizations throughout the nation but with an intentional focus on the conflict-ridden east. The Fund provides financial and technical support, enabling women on the ground to transform their lives as they themselves determine. The Fund also conducts capacity-building workshops and support women to organize themselves into groups to leverage broader impact. Additionally, FFC teaches techniques on mobilizing for advocacy missions to collectively voice women’s needs for change, call for the effective implementation of laws to protect the rights of women and girls, and harness more women’s participation and leadership in decision-making spaces. For more information about FFC, please visit: https://www.ffcrdc.org/?no_lredirect=true

 

[v] Mama Cash was the first international Women’s Funds in the world. Mama Cash mobilises resources from individuals and institutions, makes grants to self-led, feminist organisations, and helps to build the partnerships and networks needed to successfully defend and advance women’s, girls’, trans and intersex people’s human rights globally. Mama Cash is driven by the conviction that giving the right kind of support to the collective action of intersex and trans people, girls and women will affect profound social and environmental change – change that is urgently required for a just and joyous world. For more information about Mama Cash, please visit: https://www.mamacash.org.  

 

[vi] Global Fund for Women (GFW) was founded in 1987 in Palo Alto, California. They are a global champion for the human rights of women and girls. GFW uses their powerful networks to find, fund, and amplify the courageous work of women who are building social movements and challenging the status quo. By shining a spotlight on critical issues, they rally communities of advocates who take action and invest money to empower women. For more information about GFW, please visit: https://www.globalfundforwomen.org/

 

[vii] FRIDA provides young feminist organizers with the resources they need to amplify their voices and bring attention to the social justice issues they care about. We enable the support, flexibility and networks to sustain young feminist visions. For more information, please visit: https://youngfeministfund.org/about-us/

 

[viii] Urgent Action Fund-Africa (UAF-Africa) is a pan-African and feminist Fund, established in 2001 in Nairobi, Kenya. Using a rapid response grant making (RRG) model, UAF-Africa supports unanticipated, time-sensitive, innovative, and bold initiatives. These enable African feminists and women’s rights organizations to seize windows of opportunity, fracture patriarchy, amplify their voices, enhance their visibility and become significant actors who can influence policy and law while shaping discourse. Such opportunities arise when an unexpected event either positive or negative creates a situation in which rapid intervention can have a significant impact. This way, UAF-Africa fills a unique grant making niche within the African feminist movement, providing steppingstones to activists as they use their agency and resilience to achieve social, economic, political and environmental justice. For more information, please visit: https://www.uaf-africa.org/

 

[ix] Batonga was founded in 2006 by fearless gender equality advocate and celebrated Beninese singer-songwriter Angélique Kidjo. With strong support from both the creative industry and the social impact sector, Batonga addresses the pressing issues faced by adolescent girls and young women most in-need on the African continent. We focus on dismantling the norms and barriers holding them back and help them transform their potential into the power to lead healthy, independent, safe, and fulfilling lives. For more information, please visit: https://batongafoundation.org/

 

[x] Foundation for a Just Society (FJS) envisions a world where all people are equally valued and lead self-determined lives. FJS’s mission is to advance the rights of women, girls, and LGVTQI people and promote gender and racial justice by ensuring those most affected by injustice have the resources they need to cultivate the leadership and solutions that transform our world. For more information about FJS, please visit: https://www.fjs.org/

 

[xi] The African Women’s Development Fund (AWDF) is a grantmaking foundation that supports local, national and regional women’s organizations working towards the empowerment of African women and the promotion and realization of their rights. By specializing in grant-making and focused, tailored movement-building programs, we work to strengthen and support the work of African women’s organizations. By amplifying and celebrating African women’s voices and achievements, AWDF supports efforts that combat harmful stereotypes, and promote African women as active agents of change. For more information about AWDF, please visit: https://awdf.org/

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